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Wednesday, April 20, 2016

At this time of the year...

Observing
A lot of emu feathers flapping on our fences.  These crazy creatures race up and down with no particular place to go, it seems.
 

Harvesting
Our olive crop.  This year we enlisted the help of some friends and bribed them with lamb shanks for dinner and the promise of fresh olive oil.



Exploring
The ruins of an old homestead on our property.  Time and weather slowly uncover previously unseen bits and pieces including this fragile wool bale stencil and parts of an old enamel jug or teapot.   Thinking about the conditions that previous farming generations faced is truly humbling as we spin around in our modern four wheel drive vehicles.



Baking
Muesli, quinces, chocolate chip biscuits and thin sourdough leftovers baked in the oven.


Appreciating
Homemade pesto gifted to me by my friend Zara.  I know I have said it before but there is just something so special about homemade gifts. 


Reading
Shed by Simon Griffiths, this book makes me want my own ramshackle shed made of rusty corrugated iron, with space to tinker in peace and perhaps an old stove in one corner.  Or an old timber boat just sitting there waiting for an adventure.  Just like Shack this book provides a perfect mini escape.  

Flow magazine is new to me and is full of soft, papery goodness if you are that way inclined, which I am.  

Also, Graziher magazine where a few of my photos and words make an appearance in the autumn issue.  

What is happening at your place at this time of the year?

Are you baking or harvesting or reading?  

I hope your midweek is feeling sunny and gentle x

20 comments :

  1. What happening at my place is lots of planting of winter veggies and crocheting lots of squares for the blanket I am baking for my bed. Your photos as always are wonderful.

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  2. I would love to have a poke around the ruins at your place Jane.
    When I worked as a governess the boys used to chase emus in their utes - gosh they were hilarious (the emus, not the boyos). It sounds like a horrible thing to do, but don't worry, the emus always won!

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    1. I think emus have always provided a lot of entertainment in the bush Kylie!

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  3. Lovely post Jane. What a bumper crop of olives. Love also the old rusty remains of a bygone era. And of course, your baking energy is always inspiring.

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  4. homemade pesto! I did not grow enough basil this year for pesto, so I can appreciate how wonderful that gift would be.
    I am off to check out the magazine with your photos! amazing!

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    1. Thank you e, I am a huge pesto fan too!

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  5. I'm always happy to see a post from you pop up in my inbox, Jane. Your gorgeous photos and thoughtful words lift my day. Spring is getting into its stride here – we've had glorious sunshine but there's still a nip in the wind. My greenhouse is full of young plants and I'm spending as much time as I can outdoors. How do you press your olives? Do you preserve any or make oil out of all of them? Congratulations on having your pictures and words in print. Brilliant. Sam x

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    1. Thanks for sticking with me Sam, I always appreciate your comments. We send our olives to a local cooperative who have an olive oil press. We press almost all of them into oil, we received 25 litres of oil from this crop. In the past we have preserved our olives but in reality we can only eat a limited amount. For us, oil is much more versatile and useful.

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  6. Emus sound like they behave like Guinea Fowl! Beautiful photos as always. It's very cool and drizzly here tonight, I'm tucked up inside with spaghetti bolognese planned for dinner.
    I'm off to check out Flow Magazine. And congratulations on having your photos in Graziher! It's a wonderful feeling when your work is published.
    Happy rest-of-week,
    Sarah x

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    1. Emus are just as crazy as guinea fowl, only larger and much more dangerous if you cross their path! Thank you Sarah, to see my work published is rather surreal! x

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  7. Lamb shanks and fresh olive oil sounds a pretty good bribe to me. It's rather sad that old homesteads fall to ruin. Researching our family history we found photos of a township near Adelaide where one of our ancestors lived,that no longer exists. All that hardship setting up and building for it all to disappear.
    Spring is here and we're halfway through planting 1200 Christmas trees by hand, which is rather back-breaking. Hey, ho better get back to work.

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    1. Your family history sounds fascinating Anne. Good luck with those trees...hey ho! x

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  8. What a delight to visit your place again, Jane xx

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  9. I adore Flow. I only get it occasionally, so it's like opening a well loved birthday present when I do.
    And beautiful light in all these pictures Jane, just gorgeous. Enjoy the cooler Autumn days. xx

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    1. Thank you Brydie, Flow is like a special pressie!

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  10. I picked up 'Graziher' at my local newsagency this week. I haven't had time to read it yet, in fact, I only pulled it in off the back seat of my car today. Looking forward to having a proper sit down and read.

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    1. I wonder if you have read it yet Katie...and what you thought?

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Hello and welcome. I will try to reply to all comments eventually because I love the conversation! Jane